You Already Know

We all know how to get in shape. We know to eat vegetables and fruits. We know to cut out pizza and burgers. We know to exercise daily. We know to spend less money than we make. We know we should read more. We know the importance of eight hours of sleep. We know to change our air filters, and we know to floss our teeth.

Knowledge is not the problem. We know exactly what we should do. There’s nothing that a book about fitness or finances or health really has to offer you. Knowledge ain’t the problem.

There’s obviously a disconnect between what we know and what we do. And that disconnect is called weakness. When you eat donuts and skip workouts, overspend, and “forget” to floss, it’s because of weakness. Your body controlled your mind.

The way you get stronger mentally is the same way you get stronger physically – gradual improvement through regular exercises.

Gradually replace fast food with apples and carrots. Consistently make small contributions into an investment account. Shoot for just thirty extra minutes of sleep, and start reading for just ten minutes a day. It’s what we do that defines us, not what we know.

More Than Just A Good Man

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In The Way of Men, Jack Donovan, differentiates between being a good man and being good at being a man.

If you ask people what it means to be a man you will hear answers like: “A real man is kind and loving.” “A real man spends time with his kids.” “A real man keeps his word.”

But aren’t those statements equally true of “good women”?  Aren’t they kind, loving, family oriented, and trustworthy?

Statements like, “A real man would never hit a woman,” isn’t describing a real man, it’s describing a good man. It’s certainly possible to be honest and kind and be a total sissy. And it’s equally possible to be strong and manly and be evil. As Donovan points out, we wouldn’t label assassins, gangsters, fighters, or soldiers as unmanly simply because they act immorally.

We should strive to be good men, but we must also be good at being men.  It’s not enough just to be kind and honest – so are women! We must also be good at being men. Protecting. Providing. Romancing.

Set the examples of strength and honor. You have to actually be a man, before you can be a good man.

Higher Goals

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If my only goals in life were to earn a paycheck and watch sports then it would be hard not to give in to over eating, over drinking, and looking at porn. After all, if my goals were all self-centered then why shouldn't my actions be self-centered, too?

Alcohol and drug abuse, gluttony, slothfulness, and lust are all based in selfishness. They're all about making yourself feel better and disregarding others.

The best way to overcome these problems, and the depression that always accompanies them, is to start living for others. When we volunteer to help the hungry, the homeless, the orphaned, the widowed, and the sick we take the focus off of our problems. And when we're not focused on our own issues, then we won't be constantly trying to self-medicate them. 

Be a big brother. Take a fatherless-kid fishing. Start an appreciation breakfast for your local police. Start a hiking group for veterans, or serve at a homeless shelter. Think beyond yourself, because a life lived in pursuit of personal pleasure is a life destined for misery and regret.

Don’t settle for just existing. Set noble goals, and live a life that will change someone else's.