Tenacity and Leadership

On October 24, 1915, the men abandoned ship and stacked their supplies on an iceberg. Hundreds of miles away from shipping routes or aid stations, their Captain, Ernest Shackleton, came up with a plan. They ultimately traveled over 1,000 miles of Arctic Ocean on floating ice and in small lifeboats. Once he made it to South Georgia Island, Shackleton walked 32 miles over mountains covered in snow and ice. Suffering frostbite, hunger, fatigue, and insurmountable odds, Shackleton saved his crew. He simply refused to quit.

We will probably never be in a position as harrowing as Shackleton’s, but the quality of tenacity is just as important. A good leader is one who holds fast during the storms, and refuses to quit even when the chips are down.

Maybe you feel like your marriage is sinking, or your business is struggling. Sometimes just the mundane, daily routine of going to work, and raising kids saps the life out of us. If you’re thinking about quitting, the strongest thing you can do is tell someone you need help. Even Shackleton relied on his crew. One of the most tenacious things a man can do is ask for help instead of giving up.